In this article, I will be sharing a common misconception that students typically have on the types of pollination.

Firstly, let us start with the definition of pollination.

Pollination is the transfer of pollen grains from the anther to the stigma of a flower.

In this definition, we are not concerned about the origin of the pollen grain.

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There are three possible locations where pollen grains can be found:

#1 From the anther of the same flower

#2 From the anther of another flower within the same plant/tree

#3 From the anther of another flower from another plant/tree

We have learnt that there are two types of pollination:

#1 Self-pollination

#2 Cross-pollination

Is your child able to match the type of pollination with any of the 3 possible locations mentioned above?

Self-Pollination:

#1 From the anther of the same flower

#2 From the anther of another flower within the same plant/tree

Cross-Pollination:

#3 From the anther of another flower from another plant/tree

Did your child manage to get them right?

Many students often get confused with the definition of cross-pollination. Some students think that cross-pollination refers to pollen grains that come from another flower, regardless of the plant the flower is on.

Well, we need to get this clarify this common misconception by understanding the definitions of self-pollination and cross-pollination.

Self-pollination is the transfer of pollen grains from the anther of a flower to the stigma of a flower within the SAME plant. (The anther and the stigma can both belong to the same flower).

Cross-pollination is the transfer of pollen grains from the anther of a flower to the stigma of a flower across two different plants of the same species (same type).

Once your child has gotten that right, we can move on to the adaptation of flowers that encourage self-pollination or cross-pollination.

It is important for students to understand the differences between self-pollination and cross-pollination.

This will allow your child to draw the appropriate linkages and identify the thought process required to tackle the examination questions effectively.